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03:02pm 08/02/2017
 
 
Syona aka the Silicon Shaman


Crossposted from: http://siliconshaman.dreamwidth.org/1235309.html comment count unavailablecomments so far over there.
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 acelightning
 
10:52pm 08/02/2017 (UTC)
 
 
Ace Lightning: flying bunny
The most compelling reason possible for me to wish that I were a petite, svelte teenager... *sigh*
IconoGraphic flying bunny
 
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 siliconshaman
 
11:02pm 08/02/2017 (UTC)
 
 
Syona aka the Silicon Shaman
Actually, the interview I tracked that video down from, she said that being small and skinny put her a significant disadvantage. A smaller surface area and mass makes it harder to 'grab air' and build up speed or control.
 
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 acelightning
 
02:01am 09/02/2017 (UTC)
 
 
Ace Lightning: flight
Not that I could ever afford to try it, but there are a few "wind tunnel" facilities (operated by various companies) vaguely near where I live. I can't get a straight answer out of any of the websites, but I think I'm just outside the physical limitations. I do, of course, have quite a bit of surface area...
IconoGraphic flight
 
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 siliconshaman
 
02:07am 09/02/2017 (UTC)
 
 
Syona aka the Silicon Shaman
You know, if they're anything like the one that operates near where I live they probably do freebie or half-price sessions as an enticement... and I dunno, it doesn't take much strength to do that. Although they might be more concerned about liabilities and injuries than their British counterparts, I have seen some silver-haired flyers whizzing about.
 
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 acelightning
 
04:07am 09/02/2017 (UTC)
 
 
Ace Lightning: bunnyrazz
The nearest one (which isn't even actually open for business yet) is far enough away that I'd have to drive there and stay overnight in a motel, have the flight experience, and then drive all night to get home. The motel would cost about $75.00, the flight about $125, plus fuel, tolls, and restaurant meals - say $300, give or take. They tell you to wear "comfortable shoes with laces or Velcro" - I don't own any shoes like that, so there's at least another $50. And their weight limitations are (and I can't be arsed to convert to metric) "Under 6 feet, 230 lb.; 6 feet or taller, 250 lb." I'm about 5'4", and I've weighed 240 lb for the past 25 years or more.

So I guess it'll have to wait until I can do it on the Moon. (Spot the Heinlein reference.)

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 siliconshaman
 
12:33pm 09/02/2017 (UTC)
 
 
Syona aka the Silicon Shaman
Bummer... oh well, looks like someone needs to get a move on with the 2nd generation EM drive. [which while not necessary for colonisation, would make things way cheaper!]
 
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 acelightning
 
12:50pm 09/02/2017 (UTC)
 
 
Ace Lightning: books01
Meanwhile, the Heinlein reference is The Menace From Earth - only they were doing it in one-sixth G, of course.
IconoGraphic books01
 
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 siliconshaman
 
12:59pm 09/02/2017 (UTC)
 
 
Syona aka the Silicon Shaman
Thought so... and Heinlein's math checks out BTW. A set of polystyrene wings and more-or-less 1 bar air pressure in 1/6th gee, and you could fly.

Hmm, going to have to remember that for my up-coming story. 'Angel city' in Tycho crater dome. Although 'Ace' is more a Farside resident, helping out at the radio observatory.

Edited at 2017-02-09 01:01 pm (UTC)
 
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 acelightning
 
12:55pm 10/02/2017 (UTC)
 
 
Ace Lightning: full moon
Yeah, but there's the "rapid transit" tunnel network all over Luna, and she grew up reading science-fiction books while riding trains :-D
IconoGraphic full moon
 
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 siliconshaman
 
01:05pm 10/02/2017 (UTC)
 
 
Syona aka the Silicon Shaman
Point... when she isn't catching a 'bus' sub-orbital shuttle like they did back in the old days when there was just a couple of bases...
 
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 acelightning
 
01:44pm 10/02/2017 (UTC)
 
 
Ace Lightning: mugshot
I get the impression that you're going to tuckerize me into all your Polychrome stories, one way or another. Not that I mind, of course! ;-D
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 siliconshaman
 
01:57pm 10/02/2017 (UTC)
 
 
Syona aka the Silicon Shaman
Tempting challenge.. but no... so far it's just the two, and only one of which is polychrome.

Although who was that writer that did that with his wife?
 
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 acelightning
 
02:36pm 10/02/2017 (UTC)
 
 
Ace Lightning: books01
I'm honored at the company you place me in!

Alas, though I've tried all my life to be a "Heinlein Woman", I fall short in too many ways. Just to mention a few... I suck at math, I'm a terrible shot (nearsighted from birth), I can't fence or ice-skate, I only speak three languages with any fluency, I'm not a natural redhead (and I look positively grotesque with red hair - I tried it, a very long time ago), and I've never been considered "pretty".

IconoGraphic books01
 
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 siliconshaman
 
03:55pm 10/02/2017 (UTC)
 
 
Syona aka the Silicon Shaman
OTOH, 'Heinlein women' show a considerable lack of diversity ;)

Eh, you might not fit some of the particulars, but you've the right 'never say die' spirit, which is the important part. The flaws just add 'texture'...

 
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 acelightning
 
12:12pm 11/02/2017 (UTC)
 
 
Ace Lightning: Ace in space
*blush*

I used to start arguments among SF fans by declaring that Heinlein was the only male writer in any genre who could write from a female POV and make it believable. He frankly stated, in many different places, that he firmly believed that women were superior to men in just about every way possible... but newer generations point out that his female characters, while intelligent and capable, were also always both sexually attractive, and sexually available to the male protagonist.

In addition to all the observed qualities of Heinlein Women, I have also spent my entire life trying to live up to the description of the Heinlein Human:
"A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects."
And I actually can do most of those things... although my desire to learn as many different skills as possible (and as many different things as possible) began long before I read my first Heinlein "juvie", when I was 10 or so (and well before he wrote that paragraph in Time Enough For Love).

IconoGraphic Ace in space
 
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 siliconshaman
 
12:38pm 11/02/2017 (UTC)
 
 
Syona aka the Silicon Shaman
Likewise on the list, although I note he didn't say you had to do them well... I suck at poetry. But like you, I started learning new things long before I encountered that list. Personally, I think it's a bit of a self-selection process. Those of us that kinda match his ideals, are more likely to be attracted to his writings.

I think Heinlein is a classic because he's one of those writers that observes and understands human nature, and writes about the best parts of it. Shakespeare may have written about human nature as it is, Heinlein wrote it as we would want it to be.
 
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 acelightning
 
01:09pm 11/02/2017 (UTC)
 
 
Ace Lightning: brain
I know that at least some of my earliest cravings for learning were strongly encouraged by my parents, especially my father (he was a bricoleur and technomage, although he described it as "being good with machinery"). But, as you say, that just primed me for reading Heinlein, and others of the "Golden Age" (does anybody remember Lester Del Rey?).

Writing about human nature as we would want it to be was one of the original purposes of science fiction. It's the "what if?" that drove so many of the classics. What if people could travel in the Solar System - what would they do, how would they behave? What if we met "aliens" who were drastically unlike us? What if we found a way to end war, poverty, disease? What if some unimaginable disaster struck the human race? In all cases, the authors tried to show that the best human qualities would overcome the worst.

IconoGraphic brain
 
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 siliconshaman
 
02:02pm 11/02/2017 (UTC)
 
 
Syona aka the Silicon Shaman
I remember Del Ray... although I admit I suck at putting names to titles.

It did seem like there was an unspoken purpose to sci-fi back then. Not just to entertain, like the movies, but to show us a better world, a better us. And by doing so, helping shape the present into what we wanted the future to be.

Is it just me, or does that seem rather lacking nowadays? As if society has collectively lost interest in the future. Saving those of us who've clung onto the idea that it can be better. And the vogue nowadays is to show us some grim dark dystopian nightmare that'll make our present seem better by comparison. [when it isn't lacking in any purpose other than to make the author a quick buck while entertaining us briefly.]

But then, society as a whole seems to be lacking any kind of purpose or hope, being obsessed at staring up it's own arse-hole instead... with a few exceptions that is.
 
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 acelightning
 
03:11pm 11/02/2017 (UTC)
 
 
Ace Lightning: starfleet
It was Gene Roddenberry's declared purpose to depict, in Star Trek, a "better world" in the future. This view persisted until the "reboot" began.

The hippie astrologer and Wise Fool Rob Brezny invented the concept of "pronoia" - the opposite of "paranoia" - the thought that the whole Universe is conspiring to shower you with blessings. He often takes aim at the idea that depictions of suffering, degradation, violence, despair, and ugliness are somehow more sophisticated than depictions of joy, reverence, love, beauty, and fun. Most popular media seems to operate on those assumptions, and happy endings are considered childish and shallow. But Brezny has dedicated himself to proving the opposite.

I think it's pretty obvious that, as an old hippie, and an even older science-fiction fan, I'm on the side of optimism...

IconoGraphic starfleet
 
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